From Tablet to Table by Leonard Sweet: Book Review

tablet to table

“The stories of Jesus…are not heroic legend or tales of the heavens. They are ordinary stories of ordinary people in ordinary places doing ordinary things…but in an extraordinary way.” 


Thanks to Tyndale Publishers and NetGalley for the copy of this title for reviewing purposes

The author of this title has a diverse background which I felt came through in his writing. From Tablet to Table was … interestingly different for me. In this book, the author gives his reasons for why he believes that American culture needs to get back to the table, for personal benefit as well as spiritual, and he lists numerous Scriptures to support his thoughts.

I had some positive and negative responses both with this read.

Negatives: In the beginning I found it hard to understand if the author was speaking about a literal table or a figurative table. Also, some of the Scriptures he used I didn’t see the connection to his point. For example, he states that “God’s very first commandment–is ‘Eat freely’ (Genesis 2:16)”, however I do not view that Scripture as a commandment to eat, but rather a warning of what not to eat, and it felt to me that you really needed to read the next verse to get the full meaning of what God was saying to Adam and Eve in the garden as verse 16 alone did not convey that. See below:

“But the Lord God warned him, “You may freely eat the fruit of every tree in the garden—except the tree of the knowledge of good and evil. If you eat its fruit, you are sure to die.” Genesis 2:16-17 NLT

Positives: It is apparent in his writing that the author has done his research and has used his personal history to reach these conclusions.  I can also agree with his descriptions of ‘versitis’ as he calls it, in which we have the tendency to memorize the single verse readily but conveniently ignore or dismiss the verses directly before and after; this limits our understanding of what the Scripture is really saying as we don’t get the whole picture in a single verse.


Overall, I would rate this book 3 out of 5 stars, as it was a bit difficult to get started and I couldn’t always grasp the connection he was trying to create. In spite of that, it did make me re-evaluate how I view the family table, and what I view as the family and the family table.

Rating: gold stargold stargold star

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